Last edited by Yomuro
Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

3 edition of Why Yucca Mountain? found in the catalog.

Why Yucca Mountain?

Why Yucca Mountain?

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  • 6 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Yucca Mountain Project in Washington, DC, Las Vegas, NV .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Radioactive waste repositories -- Nevada -- Yucca Mountain,
  • Radioactive waste disposal in the ground -- Nevada -- Yucca Mountain,
  • Yucca Mountain (Nev.)

  • Edition Notes

    Caption title.

    ContributionsUnited States. Dept. of Energy. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management., United States. Dept. of Energy. Yucca Mountain Project Office.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[2] p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14539806M
    OCLC/WorldCa187311374

      The Yucca Mountain nuclear waste dump, a political hot potato, is back. Published Thu, Mar 16 PM EDT. Tom DiChristopher @tdichristopher. Yucca Mountain, in the Amargosa Valley, depend on the aquifer beneath the mountain for their drinking and irrigation water. This water is sure to be contaminated if nuclear waste is stored inside the mountain. Further, Yucca Mountain is located in an extremely active earthquake zone. Read on for more details! YUCCA MOUN-TAIN Las Vegas Reno File Size: KB.

    Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada is more a ridge than a mountain. Created as deep volcanic tuff deposited by an extinct supervolcano (or caldera), it . Why was Yucca Mountain chosen? Yucca Mountain is in a remote, desert area on federal land. Read More: Why Yucca Mountain? [pdf] Most scientists around the world agree that the best place to put this radioactive material is in a facility deep underground. Home: .

    Yucca Mountain sits on federal land in Nevada, not far from Death Valley, in a remote stretch of desert, 90 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The nearest commercial establishment is a . Yucca Mountain isn’t the answer to our spent-fuel worries. But now that Congress has given the DOE a green light, events will have to run their contentious course in the federal courts and at.


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Why Yucca Mountain? Download PDF EPUB FB2

In The Road to Yucca Mountain, Why Yucca Mountain? book. Samuel Walker traces the U.S. government's tangled efforts to solve the technical and political problems associated with radioactive waste.

From the Manhattan Project through the designation in of Yucca Mountain in Nevada as a high-level waste repository, Walker thoroughly investigates the approaches adopted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Cited by: posted: February 4, Why Does the State Oppose Yucca Mountain.

Yucca Mountain is a six-mile long, 1,foot high, flat-topped volcanic ridge about 80 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The U.S. Department of Energy plans to turn Yucca Mountain into the nation's first high-level nuclear waste repository, if a study finds the site safe.

The mountain that John D’Agata is ostensibly concerned with in his slim but powerful new book, “About a Mountain,” is Yucca Mountain, located approximately miles north of Las Vegas.

Sincethe government Why Yucca Mountain? book spent almost $15 billion assessing Yucca Mountain as a place to store waste in the ground, collecting $ billion of that from electric bills, the Government Author: Reuters Editorial. About A Mountain is quirky little book. In it, John D'Agata takes a look Las Vegas, Yucca Mountain and a teenager's suicide leap off the top of a Las Vegas landmark, the Stratosphere.

Exactly what ties these things together is never made entirely clear, but half the fun of reading About A Mountain is pondering that enigmatic mystery/5. Yucca Mountain, located about 90 miles north of Las Vegas, Nev.

(Nuclear Regulatory Commission)() – The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has released the final two volumes of a five-volume safety report that concludes that Nevada’s Yucca Mountain meets all of its technical and safety requirements for the disposal of highly. Yucca Mountain is a mountain in Nevada, near its border with California, approximately miles ( km) northwest of Las d in the Great Basin, Yucca Mountain is east of the Amargosa Desert, south of the Nevada Test and Training Range and in the Nevada National Security is the site of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, which is currently Elevation: 6, ft (2, m)  NAVD Book is in Like New / near Mint Condition.

Will include dust jacket if it originally came with one. Text will be unmarked and pages crisp. Satisfaction is guaranteed with every order. UNCERTAINTY UNDERGROUND: YUCCA MOUNTAIN AND NATION'S HIGH-LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE (MIT PRESS) By Rodney Ewing **Mint Condition**.

The state's official position is that Yucca Mountain is a singularly bad site to house the nation's high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel for several reasons: GEOLOGY and LOCATION: There are many unresolved scientific issues relative to the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site.

These issues include hydrology, inadequacy of the. The Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository, as designated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act amendments ofis a proposed deep geological repository storage facility within Yucca Mountain for spent nuclear fuel and other high-level radioactive waste in the United States.

The site is located on federal land adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada, about. WHY YUCCA MOUNTAIN WILL FAIL AS A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY OPPOSE S.

– SUSTAIN THE PRESIDENT’S VETO Since only one site has been under study as the final, permanent burial site for the nation’s high-level nuclear waste. This material contains more than 95% of the radioactivity (not volume) in the dregs of the Nuclear Age.

People enter a portal of Yucca Mountain during a congressional tour of the proposed nuclear waste storage site near Mercury, Nev. (John Locher/Associated Press) By Editorial Board J   Federal lawmakers made their way to Nevada to visit the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository near Mercury.

A tour led by U.S. Department of Energy officials was held on July 14 for a dozen congressmen, who all support making the Yucca Mountain site the nation’s nuclear waste : Jeffrey Meehan. About a Mountain is a non-fiction book by the American essayist John d’Agata.

Focusing on the US government’s proposal to build a nuclear waste storage facility at Yucca Mountain just outside Las Vegas, the book weaves environmental reportage with a. But Yucca Mountain is dry. Sections of the tunnel have to be closed to ventilation to get the humidity to rise.

It is unlikely a better location for the disposal of nuclear waste could be found. Information about EPA's Yucca Mountain activities is available by calling the Agency's toll-free Yucca Mountain Information Line at or at this Web site. [back to top] How can individuals participate in EPA's regulatory rulemaking process.

@article{osti_, title = {DOE`s Yucca Mountain studies: What are they. Why are they being done?}, author = {}, abstractNote = {This booklet is about the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the United States. It is intended for readers who do not have a technical background.

It discusses why scientists and engineers think high-level nuclear waste may be disposed of. And the resulting book "About a Mountain" tells the story of Yucca and a suicide in Las Vegas, and in a way that's part reporter's notebook and part poetry.

John D'Agata is the author of "About a. Calls to Use Yucca Mountain as a Nuclear Waste Site, Now Deemed Safe The entrance to Yucca Mountain in Nevada in Republicans have pushed to use the site for storing spent reactor fuel. That's why this book is a treasure."--John H.

Gibbons, Assistant to the President for Science and Technology () Review Macfarlane and Ewing have compiled a well-chosen set of articles by technical experts describing the technology and regulatory process for developing the Yucca Mountain repository/5(4). Analysis: Trump pushing to restart Yucca Mountain but hasn’t said why Contrary to his campaign rhetoric, President Donald Trump has not articulated a position on Yucca Mountain though his administration has released a spending plan that includes $ million to jumpstart the facility.NUCLEAR INFORMATION.

AND RESOURCE SERVICE. Carroll Avenue, SuiteTakoma Park, MD NIRS (); Fax: [email protected]; Why Yucca Mountain Would Fail as a Nuclear Waste Repository.

Yucca Mountain’s remote location and arid climate were proclaimed to be winning attributes that. As I reported in this article, two states with big volumes of military and civilian nuclear wastes are suing the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to try to force it to adhere to the terms of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, which called for the development of a waste repository at Yucca Mountain, near Las Vegas.